Graduate Placements

The graduates listed on these pages have moved on from Yale University to positions in academia, government service and politics.

If you’re a Graduate from the Political Science Program at Yale University and would like to let us know what you are doing, please click here and fill out our form.


PhD award 2016

   
     

Stefan Eich
Princeton University, Society of Fellows
Personal Website

Admitted: 2010
PhD Awarded: 2016

Current Position:  Perkins-Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow, Princeton Society of Fellows

Stefan Eich is a Perkins-Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow at the Princeton Society of Fellows and a Lecturer in the Department of Politics at Princeton University. He received his Ph.D. from Yale in 2016 and holds previous degrees from the University of Oxford (B.A. in Philosophy, Politics and Economics) and the University of Cambridge (M.Phil. in Political Thought and Intellectual History). Stefan’s research and teaching interests are in political theory and the history of political thought, in particular the political theory of economic and environmental questions. He is currently at work on his first book, entitled “The Currency of Justice: Money and Political Thought.

Dissertation: The Currency of Justice: Money and Political Thought

     

PhD award 2015

   
     

Cameron Ballard-Rosa
UNC Chapel Hill
Department of Political Science
Personal Website

Admitted:  2008
PhD Awarded: 2015

C.V.

Current Position:  Assistant Professor, Political Science

Dissertation:  Regime-Contingent Biases and the Politics of Sovereign Default

Currently living in Carrboro, North Carolina

     

Rob Blair
Brown University
Personal Website

PhD Awarded: 2015

Current Position:  Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Studies
     

Lucy Martin
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Department of Political Science
Personal Website

Admitted:2008
PhD Awarded: 2015

Interests: African Politics, Political Economy, Comparative Politics

Current Position:  Assistant Professor

Dissertation:  Taxation and Accountability in Sub-Saharan Africa

     

Erin Pineda
University of Chicago
Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholars

Admitted: 2009
PhD Awarded: 2015

Current Position:  Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholar in Political Science

Erin Pineda is a Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholar in Political Science at the University of Chicago. Her research and teaching agenda investigates broad questions in the history of political thought about collective power, political action, democratic practice, social change, and the relationship between historical narratives and categories of political thought.

Erin’s work has been published in History of the Present (Spring 2015) and The Appendix (September 2014), a quarterly journal of narrative and experimental history, and has been funded by the Beinecke Rare Books & Manuscripts Library, the George M. Darr Memorial Fellowship, and a Yale University Dissertation Fellowship. She holds a Bachelors degree from Barnard College at Columbia University (summa cum laude, 2006), and a Masters degree in Political Science from Yale (2011). She completed her PhD in Political Science at Yale in 2015.

Currently living in Chicago, Illinois

     

PhD award 2014

   
     

Selim Erdem Aytac
Koç University
Personal Website

Admitted: 2009
PhD Awarded: 2014

C.V.

Current position: Assistant Professor of Political Science

Dissertation: Relative Performance and the Incumbent Vote: A Reference Point Theory of Economic Voting

Currently living in Istanbul, Turkey

     

Allison Carnegie
Columbia University
Department of Political Science

allison.carnegie@columbia.edu

Admitted: 2007
PhD Awarded: 2014

Interests: International Relations, Political Science, Political Economy
 

Current Position: Assistance Professor of Political Science

Allison Carnegie is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Columbia University. She received a joint PhD in Political Science and Economics from Yale University. Her research interests include international relations, political economy, and quantitative methods. Her book, “States Held Hostage: International Institutions and the Reshaping of Coercive Diplomacy,” is under contract with Cambridge University Press. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Political Analysis, and the Election Law Journal. She has been awarded the Provost’s Grant from Columbia University, along with fellowships from the Bradley, Falk, Ethel Boies Morgan, and Kaufman Foundations. Her essay on foreign aid delivery won the Global Development Network’s Next Horizons Essay Contest, which was cosponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Dissertation: States Held Hostage: Political Hold-up Problems and the Reshaping of Coercive Diplomacy

Currently living in New York, New York

     

Erica De Bruin
Hamilton College
Personal Website

edebruin@hamilton.edu

Admitted: 2007
PhD Awarded: 2014

Current Position:  Assistant Professor of Government

Erica De Bruin is an Assistant Professor of Government at Hamilton College. Her research focuses on civil-military relations and international security.  She received a PhD from the Department of Political Science at Yale University. De Bruin worked previously as a Research Associate in U.S. Foreign policy and International Law at the Council on Foreign Relations and as a Research Associate in the Fellows Program at the New America Foundation in Washington, D.C. She also taught international relations to high school students through Yale’s Young Global Scholars Program and the United Nations Association’s Global Classrooms Program. She hold a BA in Political Science from Columbia University.

Dissertation: War and Coup Prevention in Developing States

Currently living in Clinton, New York

     

Madhavi Devasher
Princeton University
Personal Website

PhD Awarded: 2014

Current Position:  Postdoctoral Research Associate
     
     

Celia Paris
Loyola University Maryland
Department of Political Science
Personal Website

ccparis@loyola.edu

Admitted: 2009
PhD Awarded: 2014

C.V.

Interests: American Politics, Public Opinion, Political Communication, Political Psychology

Current Position:  Assistant professor of Political Science

Dissertation: Can’t They All Just Get Along? Representative Democracy and Managing Political Disagreement in America.

Currently living in Baltimore, Maryland

     

PhD award 2013

   
     

Teresa M. Bejan
University of Oxford
Department of Politics and International Relations
Personal Website

Admitted:  2007
PhD Awarded: 2013

Video: 1

Current Position:  Associate Professor of Political Theory and Fellow of Oriel College at the University of Oxford

Teresa M. Bejan is an Associate Professor of Political Theory and Fellow of Oriel College at the University of Oxford. She received her Ph.D.with distinction from Yale in 2013 and holds previous degrees from the Universities of Chicago and Cambridge. Before coming to Oxford, she taught atthe University of Toronto and was a Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities at Columbia University.  Her current book project, Mere Civility: Tolerating Disagreement in Early Modern England and America (under contract with Harvard University Press), examines contemporary calls for civility in light of seventeenth-century debates about religious toleration. Other recent publications include: “Evangelical Toleration,” Journal of Politics (forthcoming), “John Locke on Toleration, (In)civility, and the Quest for Concord,” History of Political Thought (forthcoming), “When the Word of the Lord Runs Freely,” The Lively Experiment: Religious Toleration in America from Roger Williams to the Present, edited by C. Beneke and C. Grenda, Rowman & Littlefield (2015), and “The Difficult Work of Liberal Civility” (with Bryan Garsten), Civility, Legality, and the Limits of Justice, ed. A. Sarat, Cambridge University Press (2014). She is the winner of the American Political Science Association’s 2015 Leo Strauss Award for the best doctoral dissertation in political philosophy.

Dissertation: Mere Civility: Practicing Toleration in Early Modern England and America

     

Brian J. Fried
Brandeis University

Personal Website

Admitted: 2005
PhD Awarded: 2013

C.V.

Interests: clientelism, development, Latin America

Current Position: Kay Fellow in Comparative Politics of the Developing World

Brian J. Fried responsibilities include research and teaching on Latin America, comparative politics, and development.

Dissertation:  The End of the Closed Corral: Explaining the Decline of Clientelism in Brazil

In my dissertation, I investigate how transitions away from clientelism – the discretionary targeting of rewards to buy voters’ support – occur. Across the developing world, clientelism constrains democratic representation and economic growth. My analysis of Bolsa Família, Brazil’s conditional cash transfer program, provides strong evidence that clientelism has declined there. In work that I published in World Development, I demonstrate that  criteria do not account for the distribution of this large antipoverty program. The professionalization of the civil service played a key role in explaining Brazil’s shift away from clientelism. This professionalization provided the bureaucratic capacity which enabled politicians to fulfill their programmatic campaign promises. Without this capacity, programmatic candidates are unable to credibly commit to such policymaking and give voters a reason to defect from the clientelist status quo. Authoritarian rule in Brazil had the surprising benefit of providing future democratic leaders with sufficient capacity to implement programmatic policies.

I analyze the historical evolution of Brazil’s civil service and municipal level electoral and socioeconomic data to show how increased bureaucratic capacity leads to programmatic policymaking. A Fulbright-Hayes grant and a Fox Fellowship at the University of São Paulo provided me with the opportunity to spend two years in Brazil.  During my fieldwork, I gathered qualitative evidence from a diverse sample of municipalities in multiple states, which allowed me to assess the considerable subnational variation across Brazil. I focused on the state of Bahia, which recently experienced the collapse of a long-dominant clientelist machine. In addition, I used a grant from the National Science Foundation to design a survey that includes experimental components which test how perceptions of bureaucratic capacity shape voters’ support for programmatic proposals. This research provides  insight into how countries that experience clientelism can leverage bureaucratic capacity to improve democratic representation and economic performance.
 

Currently living in Massachusetts

     
Calvert Jones

Calvert Jones
University of Maryland, College Park
Department of Government and Politics
Personal Website

cwjones@umd.edu

Admitted: 2007
PhD Awarded: 2013

Interests: comparative politics, the Middle East, and mixed methods

Current Position:  Assistant Professor, Department of Government & Politics

Calvert W. Jones is an Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park in the Department of Government & Politics, having previously served as an Assistant Professor at CUNY-City College from 2013-2015 in the Department of Political Science.

She earned her Ph.D. from Yale University in 2013, focusing on comparative politics, the Middle East, and mixed methods.  Her current research examines new approaches to citizen-building in the Middle East, with an emphasis on goals, mechanisms, and outcomes in state-led social engineering efforts.

Her book, Bedouins into Bourgeois: Remaking Citizens for Globalization, is forthcoming with Cambridge University Press in 2017. Peer-reviewed articles have appeared in Perspectives on Politics, International Studies Quarterly, International Security, Intelligence and National Security, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, and First Monday.

She also holds an MPhil in international relations from Cambridge University, a master’s degree in information management and systems from the University of California, Berkeley, and a bachelor’s degree from Columbia University in philosophy and computer science.

Dissertation:  Bedouins into Bourgeois?  Social Engineering for a Market Economy in the United Arab Emirates

Currently living in Kensington, Maryland

     

Paul Kenny
Australian National University
Personal Site

paul.kenny@anu.edu.au

Admitted: 2006
PhD Awarded: 2013

Interests: Political Economy, Comparative Politics, Populism, Corruption, India, Latin America

Current Position:  Research Fellow

Paul Kenny joined the Australian National University in July 2013 and is currently Research Fellow of Political and Social Change. He was previously Assistant Professor of Political Science at Trinity College Dublin (2012-13). His research focuses on issues at the intersection of political economy and political order. He is currently working on a book project, provisionally titled “From Patronage to Populism”, which examines the causes and consequences of populism in India and elsewhere in the developing world.

Dissertation: The Patronage Network: Broker Power, Populism, and Democracy in India

Currently living in Canberra, Australia

     

PhD award 2012

   
     

Lihi Ben Shitrit
University of Georgia
School of International and Public Affairs

lben@uga.edu

Admitted:2006
PhD Awarded: 2012

Interests: Middle East Politics, Gender & Politics, Religion & Politics

Current Position:  Assistant Professor of International Affairs

Lihi Ben Shitrit is an assistant professor at the School of Public and International Affairs, University of Georgia, Athens. She holds a PhD, MPhil, and MA in political science from Yale University, and a BA in Middle Eastern studies from Princeton University. Her research interests center on the intersections of gender, religion, and politics in the Middle East.  In 2013-2014 she was a Research Associate at the Women’s Studies in Religion Program at Harvard Divinity School.

Her book “Righteous Transgression: Women’s Activism on the Israeli and Palestinian Religious Right,” is forthcoming in the fall of 2015 with Princeton University Press.

Ben Shitrit has taught courses on Middle East politics, women and politics, religion and politics, and qualitative research methods at DePaul University, Harvard University, and the University of Georgia. She has also worked extensively with Israeli and Palestinian NGOs on projects pertaining to women’s rights and human rights, democracy, conflict resolution, and peace-building. Before completing her PhD she also worked with the U.S. State Department and USAID on Israeli-Palestinian conflict mitigation programs.

Dissertation: Frames of Exception: Women’s Activism in Religious Political Movements

Currently living in Athens, Georgia

     

Paul Lagunes
Columbia University
School of International and Public Affairs
Personal Website

pfl2106@columbia.edu

Admitted: 2005
PhD Awarded: 2012

C.V.

Articles: 1 - 2 - 3

Interests: research, writing, teaching

 

Current Position:  Assistant Professor School of International and Public Affairs

Paul Lagunes is an Assistant Professor at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. His research focuses on corruption, especially as it affects subnational governments in the Americas.

Two basic questions motivate Lagunes’s research: First, how does corruption actually work in practice? Second, what tools are available for limiting corruption’s harmful effects? By relying on randomized control trials, Lagunes offers insights on corruption’s regressive impact on society, the factors maintaining a corrupt status quo, and the conditions under which anti-corruption monitoring is most effective.

He has published articles in Latin American Research Review, Political Psychology, Harvard Journal of Hispanic Policy, Politics & Policy, and Journal of Social Issues, among other outlets. Lagunes is also the co-editor with Susan Rose-Ackerman of “Greed, Corruption, and the Modern State: Essays in Political Economy.”

Lagunes is currently studying corruption in infrastructure projects in Peru’s municipal governments, and teaches the master’s-level course “Local and Global Corruption: Maneuvering Toward Good Governance.” He obtained his Ph.D. in political science from Yale University.

Dissertation Title: Monitoring as a Democratic Imperative: A Study on Corruption and Accountability in Mexico

Advice to those Entering the Workforce:  Please feel free to contact me to discuss.

Current living in New York, New York

     

Bonny Lin
RAND Corporation

Admitted: 2007
PhD Awarded: 2012

Current Position: Associate Political Scientist

Bonny Lin focuses on a range of security and defense issues in Asia and Europe.

Currently living in Washington, D.C.

     

PhD award 2011

   
     
Onur Bakiner
Department of Political Science
Seattle University
Personal Website

bakinero@seattleu.edu

Admitted: 2005
PhD Awarded: 2011

C.V.

Current position: Assistant Professor of Political Science

Onur Bakiner is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Seattle University. His past research on truth commissions will be published under the title Truth Commissions: Memory, Power, and Legitimacy by University of Pennsylvania Press. Currently he has been working on a research projectexamining judicial actors during prolonged internal conflict in Colombia and Turkey. His research and teaching interests include transitional justice, human rights and judicial politics, particularly in Latin America and the Middle East. His articles have been published in the International Journal of Transitional Justice, Nationalities Papers, and Memory Studies.

Dissertation: Coming to Terms with the Past Power, Memory and Legitimacy in Truth Commissions

Currently living in Seattle, Washington

     

Xiaobo Lu
University of Texas, Austin
Department of Government
Personal Website

Admitted: 2005
PhD Awarded: 2011

Interests: Distributive Politics of Development, Chinese Politics, Comparative and International Political Economy

Current Position:  Assistant Professor of Government

Dissertation:  The Political Causes and Consequences of Inequality of Opportunity

Currently living in Austin, Texas

     

Joel A. Middleton
University of California, Berkeley
Personal Website

joel.middleton@gmail.com

Admitted: 2005
PhD Awarded: 2011

Current Position:  Assistant Professor, Political Science

Currently living in Berkeley, California

     

PhD Awarded 2010

   
     

Karisa Cloward
Southern Methodist University

kcloward@smu.edu

Admitted: 2004
PhD Awarded: 2010

Interests: International Norms, Transnational Activism, Non-Governmental Organizations, the International Aid Regime, Gender and Politics, Sub-Saharan Africa

Current Position: Assistant Professor of Political Science

Karisa Cloward is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Southern Methodist University. Her book, “When Norms Collide: Local Responses to Activism Against Female Genital Mutilation and Early Marriage,” is forthcoming with Oxford University Press. Her work has been published in International Organization and Studies in Comparative International Development. She is the winner of the 2015 Robert O. Keohane Award for best research article published in International Organization by an untenured scholar.

Dissertation: When Norms Collide: Micro-Level Responses to the Transnational Campaign Against Gender-Based Violence

Currently living in Dallas, Texas

     

Dominika Koter
Political Science Department
Colgate University
Personal Site

Admitted: 2003
PhD Awarded: 2010

Articles: 1 - 2

Interests: Clientelism, Ethnic Politics and Elections, with a focus on Sub-Saharan Africa

Current Position: Assistant Professor of Political Science

Dominika Koter is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Colgate University. Her research interests include clientelism, ethnic politics and elections, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Her works has been published in World Politics and the Journal of Modern African Politics.

Dissertation: Ties and Votes: Social Structure and Electoral Politics in Africa

Currently living in Manlius, New York

     

Robert Person
United States Military Academy, West Point
Department of Social Sciences
Personal Website

robert.person@usma.edu

Admitted: 2003
PhD Awarded: 2010

Interests: International Relations, Comparative Politics, Post-Soviet, Nationalism, Military, Democracy
 

Current Position:  Assistant Professor of International Relations and Comparative Politics

Dr. Robert Person is an Assistant Professor of International Relations and Comparative Politics at the United States Military Academy (West Point).  His research and teaching interests include post-Soviet politics, democratization, authoritarianism, nationalism, mass political participation, and political economy.  His current book project explores the deep and durable impact that economic crises play in shaping citizens’ long-term beliefs about democracy and dictatorship in new democracies.  It is based on extensive research carried out across former Soviet states including Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Latvia, and Estonia.  Dr. Person earned his Ph.D. in political science from Yale University in 2010.  He also holds a master’s degree in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies from Stanford University (2003), as well as a B.A. in international relations and Slavic Languages & Literature from Stanford (2002).

West Point is a four-year liberal arts college and military academy whose mission is “To educate, train, and inspire the Corps of Cadets so that each graduate is a commissioned leader of character committed to the values of Duty, Honor, Country and prepared for a career of professional excellence and service to the Nation as an officer in the United States Army.”  Faculty at West Point contribute to that mission in the classroom, through their own scholarship, and through deep engagement with cadets in other activities around the Academy.  My primary responsibility includes teaching undergraduate courses in international relations, comparative politics, international political economy, and nationalism.  I also serve as the West Point program advisor for Fulbright Student Programs and the Fulbright Scholar program. Additionally, I serve as a member of the steering committee for the Thayer Honors Program, West Point’s version of an honors college.  Finally, I am involved in cadet development and training outside the classroom as coach and Officer in Charge of the West Point Skeet & Trap Team.

Dissertation:  Nothing to Gain But Your Chains: Popular Support for Democracy and Authoritarianism in the Former Soviet Union

Currently living in Monroe, New York

     

PhD Dissertation
in review

   
     
Daniel S. Feder
Benenson Strategy Group

Admitted: 2010

Interests: Research, strategy, polling, messaging, campaigns

Current Position:  Senior Associate

Dissertation:  Three Essays on Citizens’ Perceptions of Government Competence, and What Those Perceptions Mean for American Politics and Policy

Currently living in New York, New York

     

German G. Feierherd
Department of Political Science, Duke University

Personal Website

Interests: Comparative Politics and political economy

Current Position:  Postdoctoral Associate

Dissertation:  Left Behind: How Politics Shapes Labor-Markets in Latin America

Currently living in Durham, North Carolina

     

Rebecca Nielsen
Texas A&M University

Personal Website

Current Position:  Visiting Lecturer in International Affairs

I study political development, violent conflict, religion and magic. My dissertation examines the differential impact of civil war on widespread ‘secret society’ organizations in West Africa and how this has influenced subsequent levels of women’s local and national political integration. Data collection and analysis for this project, including twelve months of fieldwork in Sierra Leone and Liberia, received support from the National Science Foundation, the Yale MacMillan Center, and the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation. I am also a collaborator on a Department of Defense Minerva Grant that examines the interaction of armed conflict and marriage markets.

Currently living in College Station, Texas

     

Nasos Roussias
University of Sheffield
Department of Politics

nasos.roussias@gmail.com">nasos.roussias@gmail.com

Admitted: 2002
PhD Awarded: 2009

Current Position:  Lecturer, Department of Politics

Dissertation: Party System Evolution in Transitional Democracies: Learning and Strategic Coordination

Currently living in Sheffield, England

     

Stephen Shewfelt
Slover Linett Audience Research

Admitted: 2002
PhD Awarded: 2009

Current Position: Senior Associate, Slover Linett Audience Research

Steven Shewfelt is Senior Associate at Slover Linett Audience Research, an audience research firm for the arts, culture, and informal science sector. Prior to joining Slover Linett, he served as deputy director of the Office of Research & Analysis at the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). In that role, he conducted and managed qualitative and quantitative research projects focused on evaluating the agency’s performance as a grant-maker and understanding the role of the arts in society (see the NEA’s flagship Survey of Public Participation in the Arts).

Prior to his time at the NEA, Steve conducted quantitative and qualitative research for the Department of Defense, the World Bank, the United Nations Development Programme, the Carter Center, and the Institution for Social and Policy Studies at Yale University. His research has taken him throughout the United States and to Afghanistan, Indonesia, and Bosnia. Steve has also worked in the conflict management field, facilitating large and small group discussions of complex social problems and highly controversial issues. Among his clients were the U.S. Postal Service and the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Steve holds a PhD in political science with a focus on quantitative analysis from Yale University, an MA in international studies from DePaul University, and a BA from Northwestern University. He is also a veteran of the U.S. Navy.

Currently living in Evanston, Illinois
 

     

Rachel Milstein Sondheimer
United States Military Academy, West Point
Department of Social Sciences

rachel.sondheimer@usma.edu

Admitted: 2001
PhD Awarded: 2006

Current Position:  Associate Professor and Director, American Politics Program

Rachel Milstein Sondheimer is an Associate Professor and the Director of the American Politics program in the Department of Social Sciences. She came to West Point in 2006 after receiving her PhD in Political Science from Yale in 2006. Rachel currently teaches SS468: Political Participation and SS360: Political Analysis.  She has taught a variety of courses, including Politics and the Media, Campaigns and Elections, Race, Gender, and Sexuality, Public Policymaking, American Politics, Advanced American Politics, and Public Administration and Bureaucracy.

Dissertation: The Education-Participation Nexus: Rethinking Conventional Wisdom with Randomized and Natural Experiments

Currently living in Ridgefield, Connecticut

     

Peter J. Verovsek
Harvard University
The Committee on Degrees in Social Studies
Personal Website

Admitted:2007
PhD Awarded: 2013

C.V.

Current Position:  Lecturer on Social Studies

I am a critical theorist interested in the effects of collective memory and globalization on the development of a new postnational politics. My research to date has focused on how memories of war and suffering can act as resources for political innovation following historical ruptures. I have recently completed a full draft of my book manuscript, The European Rupture: A Critical Theory of Memory and Integration in the Wake of Total War. In addition to collective memory studies, my interests also include European integration, the role of public intellectuals in modern democracies, global governance and transitional justice.

Dissertation: A New Beginning for Europe: Memory, Rupture and Integration in the Wake of Total War

Currently living in Cambridge, Massachusetts


Earlier PhD Graduates.

Min-Young

Han

PhD

5/23/2011

Mario Leonardo

Chacon Barrero

PhD

5/23/2011

Ryan

Garcia

PhD

5/23/2011

Alexander

Kirshner

PhD

5/23/2011

Tiffany

Davenport

PhD

5/23/2011

Gemma

Sala

PhD

12/4/2010

Mei

Guan

PhD

12/4/2010

Nihal Turkuler

Isiksel

PhD

12/4/2010

Ana

Arjona

PhD

12/4/2010

Joseph

Lampert

PhD

12/4/2010

Abbey

Steele

PhD

12/4/2010

Gaye

Ilhan Demiryol

PhD

5/24/2010

David

Leslie

PhD

5/24/2010

Laia

Balcells

PhD

5/24/2010

Shatema

Threadcraft

PhD

5/24/2010

Brandon

Kinne

PhD

12/12/2009

Christopher

Mann

PhD

12/12/2009

Stephen

Kaplan

PhD

12/12/2009

Josip

Glaurdic

PhD

5/25/2009

Michael

Helfand

PhD

5/25/2009

Nicole

Kazee

PhD

5/25/2009

Stephen

Engel

PhD

5/25/2009

Matthew

Hall

PhD

5/25/2009

Laiyee

Leong

PhD

12/13/2008

Debra

Shulman

PhD

12/13/2008

Chuanjie

Zhang

PhD

12/13/2008

Tarek

Masoud

PhD

12/13/2008

Shiru

Wang

PhD

12/13/2008

Sonali

Chakravarti

PhD

12/13/2008

Charalampos

Mylonas

PhD

12/13/2008

Kushanava

Choudhury

PhD

12/13/2008

Timothy

Pachirat

PhD

5/26/2008

Takeshi

Ito

PhD

5/26/2008

Gahodery

Rodriguez

PhD

5/26/2008

Jennifer

Tobin

PhD

5/26/2008

Angelica

Bernal

PhD

5/26/2008

Stuart

Chinn

PhD

5/26/2008

Stephen

Kosack

PhD

5/26/2008

Daniela

Donno

PhD

5/26/2008

Andrew

Volmert

PhD

5/26/2008

Rafaela

Dancygier

PhD

12/8/2007

Elizabeth

Saunders

PhD

12/8/2007

Michelle

Clarke

PhD

12/8/2007

Mayling

Birney

PhD

12/8/2007

Nandini

Deo

PhD

12/8/2007

Julia

Azari

PhD

12/8/2007

Jingqian

Xu

PhD

12/8/2007

Justin

Zaremby

PhD

12/8/2007

Winifred

Amaturo

PhD

5/28/2007

Jaime

Lluch

PhD

5/28/2007

Chinyelu

Lee

PhD

5/28/2007

Anton

Orlich

PhD

5/28/2007

Sonya

Winton

PhD

5/28/2007

Joanna

Mosser

PhD

5/28/2007

Matthew

Glassman

PhD

5/28/2007

Danilo

Petranovich

PhD

5/28/2007

Thomas

Pepinsky

PhD

5/28/2007

Jennifer

Smith

PhD

12/9/2006

Lilach

Gilady

PhD

12/9/2006

Vineeta

Yadav

PhD

12/9/2006

Zhiming

Chen

PhD

12/9/2006

Aleksandra

Sznajder

PhD

12/9/2006

Daniel

Galvin

PhD

12/9/2006

Melvin

Rogers

PhD

12/9/2006

Sonu

Bedi

PhD

12/9/2006

Nancy

Brune

PhD

5/22/2006

David

Yoon

PhD

5/22/2006

Jun

Saito

PhD

5/22/2006

Robin

Hayes

PhD

5/22/2006

Matthew

Light

PhD

5/22/2006

Annalisa

Zinn

PhD

5/22/2006

Rachel

Sondheimer

PhD

5/22/2006

David

Engstrom

PhD

12/10/2005

Dorian

Warren

PhD

12/10/2005

Helen

Erler

PhD

12/10/2005

Naomi

Murakawa

PhD

5/23/2005

Alexandra

Guisinger

PhD

5/23/2005

David

Nickerson

PhD

5/23/2005

Amy

Rasmussen

PhD

5/23/2005

Andra

Gillespie

PhD

5/23/2005

Douglas

Woodwell

PhD

5/23/2005

Yumin

Sheng

PhD

5/23/2005

Nomi

Lazar

PhD

5/23/2005

Sarah

Dix

PhD

12/11/2004

John

Lee

PhD

12/11/2004

Alissa

Ardito

PhD

12/11/2004

Matthew

Green

PhD

12/11/2004

Rachel

Seher

PhD

12/11/2004

Thomas

Miley

PhD

5/24/2004

Willem

Maas

PhD

5/24/2004

Raluca

Eddon

PhD

5/24/2004

Ethan

Leib

PhD

5/24/2004

Elizabeth

Cohen

PhD

12/6/2003

Kelly

Whitaker

PhD

12/6/2003

Sarah

Song

PhD

12/6/2003

John

Phillips

PhD

12/6/2003

Patricia

Nordeen

PhD

5/26/2003

Jessica

Allina-Pisano

PhD

5/26/2003

Jamie

Morin

PhD

5/26/2003

Jason

Sorens

PhD

5/26/2003

Jana

Kunicova

PhD

5/26/2003

Casiano

Hacker Cordon

PhD

12/7/2002

Dara

Strolovitch

PhD

12/7/2002

Mary

Cooper

PhD

12/7/2002

Andrew

Stigler

PhD

12/7/2002

Anne Simone

Kleinman

PhD

5/27/2002

Wenhao

Cheng

PhD

5/27/2002

Gregory

Forster

PhD

5/27/2002

Colleen

Shogan

PhD

5/27/2002

Nathan

Jensen

PhD

5/27/2002

John

Gould

PhD

12/8/2001

Meredith

Weiss

PhD

12/8/2001

Janelle

Wong

PhD

12/8/2001

Mpingo

Bugg

PhD

5/21/2001

Mark

Stein

PhD

5/21/2001

Robin

Theurkauf

PhD

5/21/2001

Eileen

Hunt

PhD

5/21/2001

Steven

Wulf

PhD

5/21/2001

Jaechun

Kim

PhD

5/21/2001